Home All about Morricone A English introduction about "INSEGUENDO QUEL SUONO&quo
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The latest news on May 12, 2017: The author has been informed,the book 《INSEGUENDO QUEL SUONO “LA MIA MUSICA, LA MIA VITA”》 will be translated and published by Chinese publishers. Welcome your participation if If you know both Italian and Chinese. Please contact to me for further discuss cooperation (qilingren@hotmail.com or qilingren@vip.126.com
Language and writing is an obstacle for the ordinary Chinese to understand Ennio Morricone,especially in Italian, because it is far less popular than English in China.
《INSEGUENDO QUEL SUONO “LA MIA MUSICA, LA MIA VITA”》in a very important book for Morricone fans. It has been published for 1 year,but it is Italian only up to now. I'd love to read this book very much, recently Didier also mentioned the book in his this post. I have found a English introduction in this web site, the following is its content for sharing. I would like to see the INSEGUENDO QUEL SUONO in English version as soon as possible:
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The greatest Italian composer of the twentieth century has almost eighty years old, lives in Rome and has behind hime five hundred scores, two Oscars on the notice board and the respect of more than one generation of fans. Sixty year career including pop songs, absolute music, scores of all sorts and one now unmistakable style: Ennio Morricone has lived many lives, and all success.
Trained as a trumpeter and past arranger for RCA Italiana label, experiments and long-lasting professional relations with directors of the caliber of Sergio Leone, Elio Petri, Pier Paolo Pasolini and Giuseppe Tornatore. Indelible in the minds and especially poignant the sound comments of the composer for western, yellows, dramatic and even erotic movies for Tinto Brass.
“Inseguendo Quel Suono. La Mia Musica, La Mia Vita” (2016), published by Mondadori, is his most complete autobiography, written with the young composer Alessandro De Rosa. A book resulto of years of meetings between the two, more or less unwitting authors of a dialogue between two generations in open connection, however, share something beyond the passion for their craft.
The work, soon also translated into other languages, is full of information, anecdotes and reflections, allowing the reader to get in touch with even less public aspects of Ennio Morricone, beyond the usual relationship between music and cinema. An exploration across the board conducted with glossy honesty by an enthusiast who has ‘chased’ him since he was nineteen.
Alessandro, how was it possible to retrace the history of such a personality in less than four hundred pages? Deepen it has been a long and complex, or am I wrong?
It was difficult because we had to make decisions, sometimes painful, and choose what to include or exclude in the text. The book is not motivated, however, of my decisions alone. I have made proposals to Ennio and with him we decided what to include or exclude. He accepted totally my last proposal, asking me to remove only some parts and add others. We often confronted about which was the direction to follow.
Ennio believed that was crucial let people know something about him, his thought. Usually, this one is not apparent in interviews: journalists are encouraged to ask him more questions about cinema. At the heart of this book is, however, the thought of a musician and a person who strongly worked in a given Italian musical context and culture. It was important to tell both the context and his views. And Ennio appreciated as has been summarized his thinking.
Autobiography is made up of a set of questions and answers. Sometimes the memories of both the composer and the man run fast as a stream of consciousness. How to best organize them?
Some preliminary conversations to the book have been instrumental to orient myself on to do. When you approach to such an important person, which has already been interviewed numerous times, you must be careful, because his history is known and it can not even be told in first person. And the image of Ennio may even be different from what you see.
I read, for example, several interviews that have touched the theme dear to him of so-called ‘absolute music’. Once I spoke with him I understood more. It is something that has more than one meaning. The word ‘absolute music’ contemplates various contents. And then my role suddenly changes. I finished, instinctively, with ‘hazard’ one or more questions.
Ennio, for his part, responded positively and confirmed some of my assumptions. I do not think I’m neither a psychologist nor a miracle, as he claims. It is, of course, true that there is harmony between us and perhaps we have similar opinions on certain facts that, though, he has lived in first-person. It is, however, also true that he who can listen to another person can, then, go very deep, perhaps also including what is not said.
Some preliminary conversations to the book have been instrumental to orient myself on to do. When you approach to such an important person, which has already been interviewed numerous times, you must be careful, because his history is known and it can not even be told in first person. And the image of Ennio may even be different from what you see.
I read, for example, several interviews that have touched the theme dear to him of so-called ‘absolute music’. Once I spoke with him I understood more. It is something that has more than one meaning. The word ‘absolute music’ contemplates various contents. And then my role suddenly changes. I finished, instinctively, with ‘hazard’ one or more questions.
Ennio, for his part, responded positively and confirmed some of my assumptions. I do not think I’m neither a psychologist nor a miracle, as he claims. It is, of course, true that there is harmony between us and perhaps we have similar opinions on certain facts that, though, he has lived in first-person. It is, however, also true that he who can listen to another person can, then, go very deep, perhaps also including what is not said.
Ennio is an extremely sensitive person, who feels much before thinking. Emotionally, he feels certain things. It was not so easy to put into words something that was not in words, because it involves emotions. He himself, perhaps, has also liked this situation, because he felt understood. The dialogue, at this point, could not be the best form for an autobiographical book.
Sit on his couch and, above all, develop this kind of relationship with him was a fortune. Yet his career, so open to various experiences, has been sometimes considered improperly.
Ennio is a person who tends to be free, he came to art films, to the commercial ones, to pop songs and art music. He really loves experimenting and has always done it, even when the last score seems similar to the one immediately preceding it. That is a condition almost inevitable when you realize so many works in the course of a lifetime.
He has created his own sound mark, as repeatedly stated by the musicologist Sergio Miceli, and he did it without much shame. From this point of view, I find it a sort of ‘Stravinsky’ attitude. Igor Stravinsky was a creative, frequented the salons of Paris treading on many people and his way of making music was considered disrespectful by the society.
I identified in Ennio this type of reaction to the present. He felt the need to feel free, distancing himself from the academic world and exploring different sounds. He began as arranger to deal with certain economic issues, while some of his colleagues, from different social backgrounds, could afford to be ‘artists’ and not to mingle with the common people.
The constraints, or the needs of the present, were determined to his discography. On the one hand, he was forced by fate. On the other, he has been at ease in the conditions of experience. And, so, they were both inevitable certain elitist attitudes and misjudgments. This book also serves to look with another perspective the life and work of Morricone.
The years with the Gruppo Di Improvvisazione Nuova Consonanza, not just an escape valve, were particularly important. Do we have to look nearer home to have forgotten them?
Probably, for reasons of belonging. Cinema has always been something that will appeal to the mass. Sixty years ago, when Ennio has taken the first steps, it was already consolidated. Art music, as well as much of the opera as serious as provocative of Gruppo Di Improvvisazione Nuova Consonanza, is destined to another part of the society. A minority interested in avant-garde.
Music, probably, incommunicable for some. And, above all, looking for different languages. Experiments like this end up being a few. Introduce, for example, a melodic element might have significance reach and engage a wider audience.
Listen, now, the scores for the giallo-thriller genre – such as “The Bird With The Crystal Plumage” (1970), “The Cat O’ Nine Tails” (1971) and “Four Flies On Grey Velvet” (1971) by Dario Argento – it’s not like experiencing them then, they appear less disturbing, because we are prepared for a dark sound associated with certain sequences. Dissonance related to trauma has now become a model.
The popularity of the sound ‘morriconiano’ lies, inevitably, in its great adaptability to the images and, especially, in its simplicity, as evidenced by the use of poor instruments.
Few elements, repeated themes, special timbres, in short, a winning strategy. This is the case of the soundtrack of “Investigation Of A Citizen Above Suspicion” (1970). Even when the notes are more complex, Ennio has always done so in order to let a part of them be listened a first time, in order to facilitate a following, and perhaps longer, musical moment.
His music remains easily within us a needs only an instant to whistle it. In the course of time, then, it was spread everywhere, from advertising jingles to ringtone for your phone, now free up from the movie. Success has different reasons. For sure, if we compare this music to that ‘aleatory’ one is more comprehensible, or coded, by the listener. Some works are instinctive, more complex.
He, aided by his great experience, is able to go deep transcending the movie, as happened for “The Hateful Eight” (2015). The music he gave to Quentin Tarantino goes beyond his requirements and, once again, shows a rare sensitivity, the same one that allowed him to transform a preliminary insight into a symphony, which earned him an Oscar.
The video in online (Youku 03'07") (Flash player is needed)
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I have found Alessandro De Rosa's official website, see his photo with Ennio Morricone and about the book
There are many content, You can browse it yourself , Here are a few extract:
“This long exploration, this long reflection, was important and even necessary at this point in my life. Coming into contact with your memories doesn’t only entail the melancholy of something that slips away with time, but also looking forward, understanding who I am now. And who knows what else may still happen.”
This book is the result of years of meetings between Ennio Morricone and the young composer Alessandro De Rosa. It is a dense and profound dialogue, but at the same time clear and exact, discussing life, music, and the marvellous and unpredictable ways that life and music come into contact with and influence each other. Morricone offers a rich account of the path he has followed: the years of study at the Conservatory, the professional debut with RAI and RCA, where he wrote and arranged numerous songs that achieved success – including among many others Se telefonando performed by Mina – and his collaboration with the most important Italian and international directors, from Leone to Pasolini, Bertolucci, Tornatore, De Palma, Almodóvar, and Tarantino with the recent Oscar win.
How this book was started?
................And I did. From that moment on I began studying composition, and my life became decidedly more complicated. But I learned a lot, especially from Valentina Aveta, my partner during all those years, and, close to Rome in Cantalupo in Sabina, from Boris Porena – who became my teacher –, Paola Bucan, Fernando Sanchez Amillategui, and Oliver Wehlmann, together with whom I did a lot of good thinking, from Jon Anderson of Yes, with whom I started a professional collaboration, and from all the people I met in the course of my work who have sustained me. Without those relationships, this book probably wouldn’t exist.
From time to time Morricone and I would speak on the phone. I would send him my reflections or ask him a question in a letter, and he would call me the next day to give me his perspective. Those encounters, if only by phone, were important: they gave me perspective and courage.
I stayed in Rome for six years, and when I decided to move to Holland to continue my studies, I wrote to him again to explain why I had decided to leave. He called me, as he always had, and told me the story of how he got started, having to pay his dues, the difficulties he encountered… “As soon as you come back to Rome I’d like to give you a short piece of writing on my experiences as a composer” he said.
That text was called The Music of the Cinema in the Context of History. I discovered it only in the summer of 2012, when we met again at his house. As promised, he gave me a copy and asked me to tell him what I thought. I was flattered and took a few careful notes. And that was the beginning of this project.
These pages represent only the tip of the iceberg of all that I discovered. Our conversations began in January of 2013; I lived in Holland then, but returned to Rome often.
Since that time, I worked with the goal of delivering the complete text to him before the 10-year anniversary of our first meeting. And I did. On May 8th 2015 I left Solaro – where my parents still live today – and went to Ennio’s house, hoping for his approval. I left four hours later with the feeling that a large, heavy wheel was turning on itself inside of me, slowly completing its cycle.
So that’s how these conversations began, from my strong determination and from Ennio Morricone’s trust, which allowed me to pursue this adventure. I have lived it as a precious opportunity and a great responsibility.
I would like to thank him and Maria – his wife, always so attentive and helpful –, their family and all those who have dedicated their time to me, often more than just an afternoon, to gather additional information. In particular: Bernardo Bertolucci, Giuseppe Tornatore, Luis Bacalov, Carlo Verdone, Giuliano Montaldo, Flavio Emilio Scogna, Francesco Erle, Antonio Ballista, Enzo Ocone, Bruno Battisti D’Amario, Sergio Donati, Boris Porena, and Sergio Miceli.
This book cannot discuss everything, nor does it seek to. It’s impossible to recount every single detail of one of the most influential musical personalities of the 20th century. Morricone is too complex and rich for that. But I think the reader, whether they are a musician or not, will find questions here that are relevant to him or her. At least, that is my hope.
Ennio Morricone
“It is curious to observe and re-examine one’s life through a process of this nature. To be honest, I never would have thought I would do such a thing. Then I met Alessandro, and this project developed so gradually and spontaneously that I re-established contact with the facts that arose almost without realizing it was happening. I can now say I have taken on new positions with respect to certain events, those same events that typically in the course of a lifetime simply occur without one taking the time reflect on or put them into perspective. Perhaps this long exploration, this long reflection, was important and even necessary at this point in my life. As I later discovered, coming into contact with your memories doesn’t only entail the melancholy of something that slips away with time, but also looking forward, understanding who I am now. And who knows what else may still happen. Without a shadow of a doubt it is the best book ever written on myself, the most authentic, the most detailed and well-finished. The most true.”
Press released
..............This book is the result of years of meetings between Ennio Morricone and the young composer Alessandro De Rosa. It is a dense and profound dialogue, but at the same time clear and exact, discussing life, music, and the marvellous and unpredictable ways that life and music come into contact with and influence each other.
Morricone offers a rich account of the path he has followed: the years of study at the Conservatory, the professional debut with RAI and RCA, where he wrote and arranged numerous songs that achieved success – including among many others Se telefonando performed by Mina – and his collaboration with the most important Italian and international directors, from Leone to Pasolini, Bertolucci, Tornatore, De Palma, Almodóvar, and Tarantino with the recent Oscar win.
In pages that are dizzying for any music and art lover, the master opens for the first time the door of his creative laboratory, introducing the reader to the ideas at the heart of his musical thought that make him one of the most brilliant composers of our time..........
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I have seen that "The work, soon also translated into other languages" mentioned above. But unfortunately I do not know where the English version? Please tell me (qilingren@163.com) if you have any infomation about this point, thank you very much!
Last updated on 2017-05-12 09:26:32

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